Newbie Remote Conf 2017

Jul 19-20 2017

Join Us

Learn what it takes to get a job (or better job) as a software developer without feeling like you’re running around in circles!

Are you a new developer wishing you had a Junior Software Developer position or better?

Would making 50-60k per year make a difference?

  • Do you feel stuck?
  • Wondering if you’re good enough for the next stage of your career?
  • Are you applying for jobs and not getting calls back?
  • Is it hard to figure out what to learn next?
  • Do you know all the basics but aren’t sure what intermediate skills you need?

You need to know more than just programming skills in order to have a successful career in programming.

Join us at Newbie Remote Conf to learn how.

Save time by learning what skills that employers NEED you to have.

Speakers

We've got the best of the best!

John Saddington

John Saddington

The Best Career Advice That I Took Too Late

Curtis McHale

Curtis McHale

What it Takes to Write a Great Proposal

Zachary Kessin

Zachary Kessin

Leveling Up Your Career with Meetup Talks

Aimee Knight

Aimee Knight

It’s Not Dark Magic – Pulling Back the Curtains From Your Stylesheets

Amy Simpkins

Amy Simpkins

Trade Work/Life Balance for Life Integration with the Atomic Self Paradigm

Tommy O'Keefe

Tommy O'Keefe

Moving Beyond “Find A Thing, Do A Thing”: A Roadmap For Navigating The Wild World Of Modern Javascript

James Majors

James Majors

What Making Records Taught Me About Writing Code

De Wet Blomerus

De Wet Blomerus

What I learned from applying for 107 jobs

Rob Weber

Rob Weber

No CS Degree? No Problem!

Nell Shamrell-Harrinton

Nell Shamrell-Harrinton

Open Source Governance 101

Josh Doody

Josh Doody

How to Stand Out as THE Candidate for the Job with Strong Positioning

Julia Nguyen

Julia Nguyen

Exploring Mental Illness With Open Source

Charles Max Wood

Charles Max Wood

How to Identify Your Dream Job

Charles Max Wood

Charles Max Wood

8 Ways to Get Noticed by Employers

Talks

Jul 19, 2017

Leveling Up Your Career with Meetup Talks

Jul 19, 2017 9:00AM MDT

Many developers go to meetups to meet our peers and see what is going on in the world. At various meetups I have seen great talks and really bad ones. I am going to go into what makes a good talk, how to give a good talk and how to use it to achieve real goals such as finding a new job. This is based on this blog post https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/giving-great-meetup-talk-zachary-kessin

About The Speaker

Zachary Kessin

Zachary Kessin has been a web developer for over 20 years, In that time he has used Elm, Erlang, JavaScript, TCL, PHP, Perl, Prolog, C, Scheme and a few others. He runs a training business from Be’er Sheva Israel which focuses on Elm, Erlang and Elixir.

In addition to programming Zachary likes spending time with his telescope in the desert.


Trade Work/Life Balance for Life Integration with the Atomic Self Paradigm

Jul 19, 2017 9:45AM MDT

What comes up for you when you hear the term work/life balance? Does it seem like a dream you can't ever quite achieve?

Instead of trying to find an elusive and static state of "balance" between two arbitrarily separated categories, think in terms of life integration - bringing your own unique energy as an individual into every relationship in your life, including - but certainly not limited to - the workplace.

We'll dive deep into this mindset shift using a simple, yet powerful, visual tool: the Atomic Self model.

The Atomic Self uses a simple atomic model to help participants gain a deep and current understanding of themselves as individual human beings, including what they need to thrive, their core values, and how they want to make an impact in their relationships with people and the world. This self-knowledge provides a constant anchor point, a home base to return to when external demands vie for attention, time, and energy. By possessing a deep, current knowledge of the self, we can get the most "bang for our buck" when prioritizing our own activities from self care to family life to work to community contribution. We focus on who we ARE and want to BE to make the DOing clearer and more impactful.

This talk brings in concepts from basic chemistry and physics, as well as from quantum mechanics, providing analogies and imagery that reinforce the esoteric concepts of self-discovery. It provides a framework to perform deep self analysis, then builds an actionable plan to handle roadblocks and create forward momentum in the desired direction.

The audience will leave with:

-- A revolutionary visual model to help them prioritize their self-care and support their external relationships

-- A fun new perspective on personal development based on chemistry and physics

-- A structured method to reevaluate the disparate parts of life and bring them together into a cohesive whole

About The Speaker

Amy Simpkins

Amy Simpkins is a speaker, coach, and vision architect.  She is on a mission to help professionals to rediscover themselves and what they need to truly thrive, and to design and build impactful, resilient, beautiful lives as a result of that deep self-knowledge, exploration, and grace.

For 10 years, Amy designed and flew complex missions to outer space, working in the corporate world as a spacecraft systems architect. After a personal renaissance, she discovered a new passionate calling to counsel, guide, and coach other professionals to awareness of their lives as an integrated whole, rooted at the core of self. Now, she uses the same architectural principles to help her clients create work that brings deep personal fulfillment and maximum impact.

Amy holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Aeronautics and Astronautics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and a Master of Science degree in Astronautical Engineering from the University of Southern California.


Moving Beyond “Find A Thing, Do A Thing”: A Roadmap For Navigating The Wild World Of Modern Javascript

Jul 19, 2017 11:15AM MDT

Javascript can be hard. The leap from writing simple jquery code that finds something and does something with it to building a web app with a modern framework can be huge and daunting. In this talk I will provide you with the map I had when I was first navigating this space, a map that will hopefully provide you with the kind of understanding of the terrain that will allow you to move between different frameworks with relative ease.

About The Speaker

Tommy O'Keefe

Tommy O’Keefe is a web developer at NPR, working with the website team to provide a platform for delivering breaking news, great storytelling, and rigorous reporting. Tommy has 7+ years of web development experience, and loves working at the intersection of technology and media. When he is not working, he can often be found hanging out with his wife and kids, riding his bicycle, or with his nose buried in a book.


What Making Records Taught Me About Writing Code

Jul 19, 2017 10:30AM MDT

I used to make records.  Now I make apps.  Turns out they aren't really all that different. Except one is louder. Ever wondered if there is any other career that is similar to programming?  Curious how making records may or may not related to coding?  Interested in seeing lots of pictures on a big screen while someone describes what they are?  Then this is the talk for you.  I spent 25 years making things louder and learned a few things along the way.  This talk goes over some of the obvious (and not so obvious) lessons I learned in audio that are applicable to writing software (or any other creative/technical endeavor).

About The Speaker

James Majors

After spending 25 years in the audio and video world I decided that I needed a change so I went back to one of my first passions, writing software.  I was fortunate enough join the team at POSSIBLE Mobile where I get the chance to write apps people use and occasionally talk at conferences.


What I learned from applying for 107 jobs

Jul 19, 2017 12:30 PM MDT

Learn from my mistakes, advice I received from friends, and great outcome at the end. Details: For family/personal reasons I needed a job working from home, but I was not senior enough for any of the companies in my network to consider me for that. So I set out to try and get a remote position. I spent a lot of time on the wrong things, and had a mentor guide me toward focusing on what mattered, learning and iterating through the process as I went along. I applied at 107 companies and ended up with a job at GitLab, which has been really great. I'll share a bit about what it is like to work on a team that I only see in person 1-2 times per year.

About The Speaker

De Wet Blomerus

De Wet Blomerus is a Service Engineer at Gitlab and formerly ran a not-for-profit coding bootcamp in South Africa


No CS Degree? No Problem!

Jul 19, 2017 1:15PM MDT

As a new and excited developer, you’ve probably compared and considered a variety of options for gaining experience and jumpstarting your career in software engineering: Codecademy, freeCodeCamp, local or online bootcamps, and possibly going to college for a computer science or software engineering degree might have crossed your mind. Which one is right for you? Do you have to get another degree just to even be considered for a position as a software engineer? The title might give it away. In this talk we’ll cover the lessons learned while going from a computer science student to software engineer and what resources and practiced were the most helpful along my journey.

About The Speaker

Rob Weber

Rob Weber is a recent graduate from The University of Delaware class of 2017. He is super excited to start his first full-time position as a junior software engineer for GNARBOX in Santa Monica, CA! When he’s not coding, you can find Rob playing frisbee, hiking, or chilling on the beach all day. Find him on Twitter and GitHub @robbawebba.


Open Source Governance 101

Jul 19, 2017 2:00PM MDT

Running a successful open source project is just as much, if not more, of a social task as a technical one. The combination of technical and communication skills required can seem very intimidating at first.   The good news is that these skills can be learned.  Learn 1) What Open Source Governance is 2) The Core Duties of an Open Source Maintainer, and 3) How understanding governance makes you a better Open Source contributor.  You will walk away with a better understanding of what goes on "behind the scenes" as an Open Source maintainer.  You will also walk away understanding how governance harnesses both technical and communication skills at the same time and the need for empathy both for contributors AND the work they submit.

About The Speaker

Nell Shamrell-Harrinton

Nell Shamrell-Harrington is a Sr. Software Development Engineer at Chef and core maintainer of the Habitat and Supermarket open source projects. She also sits on the advisory board for the University of Washington Certificates in Ruby Programming and DevOps. She specializes in Chef, Ruby, Rails, Rust Regular Expressions, and Test Driven Development and has traveled the world speaking on these topics. Prior to entering the world of software development, she studied and worked in the field of theatre.


How to Identify Your Dream Job

Jul 19, 2017 2:45PM MDT

Have you considered that the reason you can't find a job or a good job that you're excited about could be that you're applying to the wrong companies? This talk will walk you through the process of identifying the type of company you want to work for and then finding people who work there.

About The Speaker

Charles Max Wood

As CEO of Devchat.tv Charles Max Wood has a mission to empower programmers to change the world by helping them better understand the technologies, tools, processes, and possibilities of their craft.


Jul 20, 2017

The Best Career Advice That I Took Too Late

Jul 20, 2017 9:00AM MDT

I've been blessed with an amazing career of building software for almost two decades now, starting off at a Fortune 50 when I was 15 years old. But, I could have grown my career FASTER and more strategically if I had only taken the advice of an early colleague to heart. Unfortunately for me, it took another 10 years before I started executing against this wise counsel and only after I had hit a bit of a "ceiling" in my professional career and development! But this doesn't have to be your story. In this pragmatic talk I'll share with you my most important tool in my "professional tool belt," if you will, and give you some practical points of execution so that you can accelerate your career in the best way possible. You won't regret this 30 minute investment of your time.

About The Speaker

John Saddington

John Saddington is… a programmer for 18 years. Worked at a fortune 50 at 15 yrs old, was an exec at fortune 50 at age 25. Did non-profit for a few years. Got 2 masters degrees, one in education. Licensed marriage / pre-marriage counselor. I build startups, most failed, a few worked.? Award-winning indie-app developer. Married (12 years). Dad (10 and 6 year old). Writer. Newbie vlogger. I love mentoring others more than anything else.


What it Takes to Write a Great Proposal

Jul 20, 2017 9:45AM MDT

Proposals aren't solely for the self-employed. If you want your boss to buy in to your idea you need to sell them on it just like you'd sell a client. We'll talk about how to get the information you need to build a great proposal and how to present it to a prospect or your boss  so that you can increase the chance it gets the traction you want.

About The Speaker

Curtis McHale

Curtis is a business coach, speaker and developer. He focuses on helping businesses build effective processes so they can run the business they want without being a slave to it.


It’s Not Dark Magic – Pulling Back the Curtains From Your Stylesheets

Jul 20, 2017 10:30AM MDT

Chances are if you're a web developer you're going to have to write some CSS from time to time. When you first looked at CSS it probably seemed like a breeze. You added some border here, changed some colors there. JavaScript was the hard part of front end development! Somewhere during your progression as a front end developer that changed though! What's worse is that many developers in the front end community have simply learned to dismiss CSS as a toy language. The truth however is that when we hit a wall many of us don’t actually understand what our CSS is doing under the hood! We all like to make jokes about it, but how many of us have actually taken the time to try and understand the CSS we're writing. How many of us have actually reasonably debugged an issue to the next lowest abstraction layer when we hit a wall? All too often we settle for the first StackOverflow answer, hacks, or we just let the issue go entirely. In this talk we're going to finally take a step back and stop mindlessly throwing darts at the dart board! We’ll discuss the most common issues developers face such as, z-index, the cascade, and positioning in depth by diving deep into the browser's internal rendering engine structure to see how our styles are actually parsed. Sure, you may still not have an eye for design, but you might just walk away a CSS guru!

About The Speaker

Aimee Knight

Aimee Knight is a former figure skater, and software engineer at DramaFever, a subsidiary of Warner Bros. Outside of work, she’s a weekly panelist on the JavaScript Jabber podcast, and she regularly participates in a variety of others. In her spare time, she enjoys speaking at conferences, playing with new technology, running, working out, or trying the latest flavor of Kombucha. Find her, and her contagious enthusiasm on Twitter @Aimee_Knight!


How to Stand Out as THE Candidate for the Job with Strong Positioning

Jul 20, 2017 11:15AM MDT

Programming is becoming more and more popular, and more and more developers are vying for those programming jobs after finishing degrees, self-teaching, and graduating from code schools. So how do you stand out as THE candidate for the job when you're competing with so many other developers for that First Programming Job? The answer: Strong positioning. I'll walk you through a simple but powerful process for developing your unique positioning so that you stand out as THE candidate for the job, get more job offers, and have more room to negotiate those offers for the best salary possible.

About The Speaker

Josh Doody

Josh Doody is computer and electrical engineer, and an MBA. He didn’t negotiate his salary at his first few jobs, but quickly realized he had left a lot of money on the table. He began negotiating and doubled his salary in three years.

He took everything he learned, began helping others, and wrote Fearless Salary Negotiation, a #1 Best Seller on Amazon. Since then, he has helped many more people earn hundreds of thousands more dollars with his book, courses, and 1-on-1 coaching.


Exploring Mental Illness With Open Source

Jul 20, 2017 12:30PM MDT

If me is an app, written in Ruby on Rails and JavaScript, to share mental health experiences with loved ones. It has attracted technical and non-technical contributors from atypical backgrounds, including women, people of colour, and college/coding school students. Julia Nguyen, a recent computer science graduate from the University of Waterloo, leads the project. She has spoken and written candidly about her lifelong struggles with mental illness at school and in the workplace. In this talk, Julia will discuss how her early encounters with the OSS community shaped her perception of what an open source contributor looks like. She will also talk about how coming out with mental illness transformed into a passion project. These experiences have taught her the importance of building inclusive communities centered on empathy. This a core value in if me’s contributor community. Furthermore, the talk will explore the successes and challenges of retaining and engaging contributors. This includes reaching out to diversity in open source initiatives, valuing non-technical contributors, and encouraging contributors to openly share their personal mission in the project. All of the contributors face mental health issues, so working one-on-one each contributor to set project goals that are accommodating is extremely valuable. From a technical standpoint, the contributors come from diverse skill sets. The talk will explore the challenges of writing documentation, on-boarding contributors, improving test coverage, and making uniform technical decisions. It will also explore the design and user experience challenges of empowering users to share sensitive content.

About The Speaker

Julia Nguyen

Julia Nguyen is a software engineer, writer, and Prompt speaker from Toronto. Julia is the founder of if me, an open source mental health communication app. She organized mentorship initiatives at the University of Waterloo Women in Computer Science Undergraduate Committee. She is the lead organizer of Southeast Asian Ladies in Tech, and organizes meetups for the San Francisco chapter of Write/Speak/Code.


8 Ways to Get Noticed by Employers

Jul 20, 2017 2:45PM MDT

Most people start out sending their resume with any company that looks like they'll hire a programmer. But, after a while, start getting discouraged. The ones that have the most success usually find the job or meet their future boss because of something they did that isn't on their resume. It could be an event or a sample project. This talk goes into 8 ways to get noticed by potential employers.

About The Speaker

Charles Max Wood

As CEO of and a podcast host at Devchat.tv Charles Max Wood has a mission to empower programmers to change the world by helping them better understand the technologies, tools, processes, and possibilities of their craft.


Contact Us

Need help? chuck@devchat.tv