020 iPhreaks Show – Vim with Jason Felice

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    Panel

    Jason Felice (twitter github blog Maitria)
    Pete Hodgson (twitter github blog)
    Charles Max Wood (twitter github Teach Me To Code Rails Ramp Up)

    Discussion
    01:08 – Jason Felice Introduction
    02:03 – “Expressive Code”
    04:35 – iOS Programming in Vim

    ibtool
    Xcode

    06:39 – Why Vim?

    Muscle Memory
    The Tool Chain
    Polar Puzzles

    11:30 – Build Process

    xctool

    12:23 – Testing

    Kiwi
    The Objective Vimmer

    16:50 – Vim Tactics

    Code Completion
    clang_complete
    Omnicomplete

    21:06 – Navigation
    23:11 – AppCode
    25:22 – Toolchain Wishlist

    Scheme
    Lisp
    Clojure
    RubyMotion

    31:51 – Building and Installing Vim

    Picks

    No Mouse Fridays! (Pete)
    AppCode (Pete)
    Practical Vim: Edit Text at the Speed of Thought by Drew Neil (Pete)
    VimCasts (Pete)
    vimium (Pete)
    VimGolf (Chuck)
    Emacs (Chuck)
    Jason Felice: Getting Started with iOS Development With Vim (Jason)
    lambdanative (Jason)
    Nathan Sorenson: Clojure to Native via Scheme (Jason)

    Next Week
    Scalable Cloud Apps with Aaron Douglas
    Transcript
    PETE: My boy is teething at the moment, and we got up today at 5 o’clock in the morning. That’s nice.

    CHUCK: [Laughs]

    CHUCK: Hey everybody and welcome to Episode 20 of iPhreaks! This week on our panel, we have Pete Hodgson.

    PETE: Good morning from San Francisco!

    CHUCK: I’m Charles Max Wood from DevChat.tv. We have a special guest, and that’s Jason…is it Felice?

    JASON: Yeah, it’s Felice, that’s right. Hello from Detroit this time!

    CHUCK: I do that just to make Pete laugh.

    PETE: [Laughs] Yeah, it makes me laugh, I freaked out. [Laughs] Oh, I was going to say like you did the episode number, and I was like thinking, “Should I remind him? Because I don’t remind him, I’d keep him say anything.” [Laughs]

    CHUCK: No, I was seriously actually thinking, “I should ask Jason just to make sure I know how to say his last name,” and I was like, “Nope! I’m going to do this just for Pete.”

    JASON: [Laughs]

    PETE: Oh, man. Well, I’m touched. Thank you very much.

    CHUCK: So Jason, since you’re new to the show, do you want to introduce yourself really quickly?

    JASON: Sure! That’s probably the hardest question. I have been doing mobile development for, I don’t know, it’s like 3 years or something like that, but it really depends on what you count. I’ve done some of embedded development before that, and some dust wholesome stuff back in the day, something like ’90 something. And mostly, I’ve been on the next person, which is why I found first to home with iPhone stuff, and I’ve done some Android.

    I think the bigger focus that I have is on creating expressive beautiful code and helping people to do that because I think a lot of people just haven’t been exposed to really expressive code especially when we’re talking mobile environment.

    PETE: What do you mean by expressive code? This is a good sidebar conversation we can talk about. I’m interested particularly in expressive code in Objective C [laughs]. It’s an interesting language for that kind of stuff I think.

    JASON: It is, yes. And that brings up an interesting question, which is like ‘how much of the language you have to know before code is expressive?’ Because everybody that I have actually worked with are brought into Objective C into them, like for first couple of weeks, group of programmers who weren’t familiar with it. Like my first 2 weeks, they’re just like, “I don’t even see code. It just looks like ASCII. I’m not even sure what’s going on either.”

    CHUCK: [Laughs]

    JASON: That’s the response that I’ve got. And it’s interesting because after a week or 2, they’re like, “Oh, okay! Got it!” I think it has to do with the [unclear] versus the indentation, the way that it uses it being different from most of the languages.

    PETE: Yeah.

    JASON: But I’ve seen Kiwi who makes nice expressive tests for the most part that’s sort of the DSL approach.