VoV 029: Vue with Sarah Drasner

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    Panel:

    Special Guest: Sarah Drasner

    In this episode, the panel talks with Sarah Drasner, and John Papa is my boss! Sarah talks about the Vue alongside the panel. She goes into her many passions, and talks about how education and being a teacher is something that is quite important for her. Check out today’s episode to hear all of these topics, plus more!

    Show Topics:

    1:42 – Chuck: Let’s talk about your February article, Sarah!

    1:57 – Sarah: Sure! I have a great relationship with SMASHING magazine. They reached out to me and we started talking, because they noticed that people had questions about…

    It probably was one of my most popular articles. People were ready to graduate from jQuery.

    3:36 – Panelist: I have gotten a lot of great feedback from people on this article, too.

    4:00 – Sarah: it is a baseline. If they have heard about Vue and don’t’ know where to go from there.

    4:15 – Panelist: It’s a great way to introduce yourself to people who don’t know you.

    4:30 – Sarah continues the conversation. jQuery for a while was the “cheese stands alone” for a long time.

    5:39 – Panelist chimes in.

    6:15 – Like a long-term support system.

    6:46 – Chuck: I am usually writing apps for myself. Lots of To Do Apps.

    7:18 – Chuck I wonder how much I can run off of jQuery?

    7:37 – Sarah: jQuery to Vue? I mean personally think that it’s much more obtainable. The improvements are great. I feel like I am more in-control when I use Vue. I tell people to try a project for a certain amount of time. I can tell you that how much I like the frameworks, but you have to try it.

    9:34 – Panelist: Less code in Vue.

    9:59 – Chuck: I do like the fact that…

    10:14 – Panelist: you have to be disciplined. I am not always disciplined if I want to be honest. Where should I put a state that depends on another state?

    10:42 – Sarah to Chris – Your style guide is helpful, Chris. If you really don’t mind in a certain framework, look at what people suggest based on their experience. Then you are not making those decisions for yourself, but you can see what works for others.

    11:33 – Panelist: The style guides help them feel more confident for the people that he has talked to. They made more comfortable to feel more vulnerable.

    12:13 – Sarah: That’s why I made those snippets for VS code. If it gives me a template then those little pieces of helpers can help keep your code more attainable. To make sure that the code review is on the up-and-up.

    13:05 – Panelist: I do love those snippets. It does help me not to worry about missing certain things. I use the snippets for Live Demos. The feedback is that they don’t want to use Vue, but the snippets make it look really cool.

    13:47 – Panelist: Many people don’t know this, but…

    14:05 – Chuck: I know people are fans of jQuery…why do you hate jQuery?

    14:26 – Sarah: I got some negative feedback and positive feedback. A debate started actually within these conversations. It happened around me, actually. What people know vs. what people don’t know. It was an interesting discussion, too.

    15:26 – Panelist: Vue has this easy drop and save tag. Sarah, in your opinion…

    15:58 – Sarah: Scotch IO has great articles out there. There are tons of writers out there. Actually, because there is nice ramp-up, that does help with adaption; just all together. That has had a lot to do with it, in addition through word-of-mouth. Whether if they, do or don’t, know how to use framework.

    17:35 – Panelist: One number one thing they don’t’ like about Angular is that 99.9% time is that they are struggling with setup, bill process, when to set up different flags. It’s actually using the tool.

    18:35 – Sarah: I wasn’t looking out to switch to Vue. At first, I was thinking: “Do I really have to try this out…? Why do I have to learn this, too?” I actually fell in love with it during the process. You can see this “falling in-love” on my Twitter. That for me has been one of the best experiences for me. Programs: Babble, Sass. This I would have to install one-by-one. To note that the developer’s experience is pretty important.

    20:15 – Panelist: To have something there can create some anxiety for them. Even if they don’t need to know what those folders are can create anxiety.

    20:59 – Sarah continues this conversation with her insights and comments.

    22:00 – Panelist asks Sarah a question.

    22:12 – Sarah Drasner: It really varies depending on the users’ experience.

    23:17 – Panelist: If you are happy doing what you are doing – keep it. Don’t change.

    23:32 – Sarah: The company dictates a lot of things for you. Lots of people don’t get to decide. If you are working with one giant build, then maybe…

    24:27 – Panelist talks about a Vue template, and other topics.

    25:16 – Sarah: Code Pen.

    26:05 – Code Pen continues to be the topic of this conversation.

    27:43 – Digital Ocean’s Advertisement.

    27:21 – Chris to Sarah: You get people super excited about Vue because your demos are the BEST demonstrations. 

    30:30 – Fidget Spinner.

    31:16 – Are you into animation?

    31:28 – Sarah mentions: Smashing Magazine. Sarah’s dream job was to be in computer animation. She went to college and didn’t want to draw every frame. I can’t keep doing this. Eventually this led to we development. Full circle, I am back to what I originally fell in-love with. Coding is one of my favorite things. In animation anything can happen! In real-life you are limited, but with animation you can let your mind go wild. You can do anything. That is exciting for me. The web has so many different capabilities.

    34:19 – Can you talk about your background as an educator?

    34:28 – Sarah Drasner: I was a professor in the Greek Islands. I think teaching gives me so much joy. Especially for me to see the light in your student’s eyes. I think learning is really hard, so making that process easier for people is a goal of mine. I want to make materials easier for them to comprehend a certain topic or the material-at-hand. At first, I thought JavaScript was hard. Connecting the dots for people is worth it to me. It’s scaling my understanding. It’s moving things through the community – scale that knowledge.

    36:43 – Creating resources for students that they never had. People, I am sure, are grateful for that.

    37:19 – Sarah: t’s a really valuable thing to share this with one another. You can be a little bit selfish and when you have to teach a concept to a student this material will be embedded into you easier/better because you have to explain it.

    38:12 – Sarah: What does the H Stand for? This article came up, because I had to answer someone’s question. Writing an article really solidifies your knowledge!

    39:02 – Where do you like to teach?

    39:07 – Sarah: Frontend Masters is one of them. It continues afterwards.

    40:35 – Sarah: I still like making online content, the feedback you get in-person is very wonderful.

    41:13 – Panelist adds comments.

    41:47 – Sarah continues the conversation and talks about a specific conference. She talks about Nigeria and Nigerians.

    43:06 – Sarah: It’s actually a huge venue. We rented a media company to help with stable Internet and web access. Just making sure that everything will be stable. It’s a real conference; it’s just free to them. It’s in a couple of days. I am feeling like that it’s a lot of stuff, but I know it will be valuable. We are looking for sponsorships!! It’s a great cause and totally engaging.

    44:22 – Are you guys ready for your talks?

    46:42 – Sarah: Her talk is going to be one of the best talks there. It can be quite political, but she doesn’t do that. What changes for the developer? It is quite masterful. She is doing a repeat performance.

    47:16 – Panelist: I try…

    47:24 – Sarah Drasner: I will be talking, too.

    48:28 – Dumb jokes.

    48:50 – Sarah: I feel that jokes don’t translate well across different countries. You have to find something more universal. I pick things that are universal to the human experience.

    49:40 – Sarah: I guess in the introduction, I say who I am and then I bring Clippy on the stage…

    In addition, sometimes, TERRIBLE jokes go a long way! To show that you are actually human!

    51:36 – A Wiki later…

    51:48 – I put the bad jokes into the delivery. People need something to lighten the mood.

    52:21 – Clippy and Microsoft Bob.

    52:32 – E-Book Code Badges!

    53:12 – Picks!

    Links:

    Sponsors:

    Picks:

    Divya Sasidharan

    Chris Fritz

    Sarah Drasner

    Erik Hanchett

    Charles Max Wood